Friday, 20 October, 2017

Facebook Says Content Wasn't the Problem With Russian Election-Season Ads

Facebook says 10 million people saw shadowy Russian group's'divisive adverts during US election Facebook says 10 million people saw shadowy Russian group's'divisive adverts during US election
Wilma Wheeler | 05 October, 2017, 00:11

An estimated 10 million people in the U.S. saw the Facebook political ads purchased by Russia-linked accounts during last year's presidential campaign, the social network has revealed.

CNN said it was not specified by its sources when the ads ran in the two states.

Trump campaigned in Wisconsin and MI in the closing hours of the 2016 election cycle.

Wisconsin and MI were among the handful of battleground states that helped Trump win the presidency over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton.

Accused of having to react first, Facebook is now multiplying communications on this subject.

The constraint from lawmakers also surfaces as the end result of Las Vegas mass shooting that augments new questions about how the social network can be controlled by hypocrites and blabbermouths appending to Facebook's expanding predicament of user content.

Facebook has acknowledged about one-quarter of the 3,000 Russian-bought ads were targeted to specific geographic locations, but did not provide locations. The information regarding these ads has been forwarded to government agencies who are investigating a possible involvement of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. elections.

It's hard to say if this would have affected the result of the election, because the U.S. has a complicated democratic system not rooted in popular vote - but Facebook may have the data to make an educated guess as to its own impact.

Facebook said 8 million people report ads every day, and it's able to review millions a week manually. The company said it found 450 accounts and about $100,000 was spent on the ads.

Also, Facebook said it will add 1,000 workers to its global ads review team and invest more in machine learning to better understand when to flag and take down ads. Additionally, the tech titan recently said it would begin forcing Pages to disclose the source of funding behind political ads.

Senator Mark Warner criticized Facebook and Twitter for the shared information related to the Russian meddling.

Facebook has revealed that an estimated 10 million people in the United States saw at least one of the 3,000 political ads it says were bought by accounts linked to the Russian government. Facebook is different, because Facebook now does not disclose who is buying ads on the platform. Those pushing the ads can decide the market they want to target the ads at and then pay Facebook based on how many ads were interacted with. "While we may not always agree with the positions of those who would speak on issues here, we believe in their right to do so-just as we believe in the right of Americans to express opinions on issues in other countries", Facebook said in its post.

Recommended

Bale to miss Wales's two World Cup qualifiers due to injury Bale to miss Wales's two World Cup qualifiers due to injury Bale faces being ruled out for up to four weeks which makes him a doubt for potential World Cup playoffs next month. However, with Bale out it is unlikely that Coleman would bring in two new wingers alongside Aaron Ramsey .

Messenger Lite Launched in 4 More Countries to Increase Engagement Messenger Lite Launched in 4 More Countries to Increase Engagement Lite messenger has one difference to the regular messenger that it has no Snapchat like messenger day function or games. The Messenger Lite app uses simple and minimal visuals - which ensures that the app isn't heavy on graphics.

Dem calls for gun background check vote by end of week Dem calls for gun background check vote by end of week Republicans who reacted to the violence in Las Vegas early Monday did not call for any legislative response to the shooting. Videos of the initial gunfire in Las Vegas appeared to indicate the use of a fully automatic, machine-gun-type weapon.

Trump sued over deleted tweets backing candidate who lost Alabama runoff Trump sued over deleted tweets backing candidate who lost Alabama runoff Strange's losing campaign had a total budget of about $30 million, while Moore's winning campaign only spent about $2.5 million. Moore won , despite the fact that odd was supported by President Donald Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell .